Astronaut Ivan Wagner captured from ISS Nazca Lines, Peru.

Credit: Ivan Vagner, Roscosmos

The Nazca Lines are a group of very large geoglyphs formed by depressions or shallow incisions made in the soil of the Nazca Desert in southern Peru. They were created between 500 BCE and 500 CE. Most lines run straight across the landscape, but there are also figurative designs of animals and plants, made up of lines. The lines are typically 10-15cm deep. They were made by removing the top layer of reddish-brown iron oxide-coated pebbles to reveal a yellow-grey subsoil. Because of its isolation and the dry, windless, stable climate of the plateau, the lines have mostly been preserved naturally. Scholars differ in interpreting the purpose of the designs, but in general, they ascribe religious significance to them. They were designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1994.

The local scenery on the ground is as follows.

Credit: Wikipedia

Reference: Ivan Wagner’s Tweet
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